Perhaps you were in a car accident in Texas that was so severe that you fractured your femur. As the strongest bone in the body, the femur does not break unless the crash was a high-impact one. When it is, then usually there are other injuries that victims face, some of them life-threatening.

The complications of femur fractures

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons states that car crashes are, in fact, the number one cause of fractured femurs. Falls from an elevated surface came in second. The elderly, whose bones have become fragile, run a great risk for fractures resulting from falls.

As for crash victims, they tend to suffer more than a fracture. The injury may lead to torn muscles and ligaments, ruptured blood vessels and subsequent blood loss, blood clots and a high chance of infection if the bone protrudes from the skin. It’s not surprising that most victims need to be taken straight from the crash scene to the hospital to receive treatment.

Three types of femur fractures

The femur usually breaks along the shaft, or midsection. If it breaks at the neck, which connects to the hip, it’s called a hip fracture. If it breaks at the distal end, which connects to the knee, it’s called a knee fracture. Femur fractures can be partial, such as stress fractures, or they can be complete and require metal rods and screws to realign the bone.

Treatment usually involves the use of these metal rods or, if it’s a hip or knee fracture, of metal plates. Doctors may give antibiotics to prevent infection, prescribe pain medications and have patients undergo physical therapy and rehabilitative care. Even once the bone heals, patients may need to exercise regularly to regain strength.

A lawyer for personal attention

The motor vehicle crash you were in could give you good reason to file a personal injury claim. Even if you were deemed 50% at fault, you can still be eligible for damages in this state. You may want a lawyer to represent you, though, since negotiating a settlement can be difficult.